Tag Archives: Romance of Language

The Romance of Language: Word for the Week 4/21/17

Buzznacking: “Gossiping from place to place. –Francis Robinson’s Words Used in the Neighborhood of Whitby [Yorkshire], 1876 “Calletting, saucy gossiping. –John Brockett’s Glossary of North Country Words, 1825   Sharing some gossip over a cup of scandal broth was a … Continue reading

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The Romance of Language: Word for the Week 4/14/17

Cony: “Rabbit fur.” “Rabbit, especially the European rabbit.” “Dupe.” Archaic —from Merriman-Webster Dictionary “A generally naive, unsophisticated person. Someone easily robbed or conned out of money.” —from Urban Dictionary.com   HAPPY EASTER!                  … Continue reading

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The Romance of Language: Word for the Week 4/07/17

Groaning Cheese: “It is customary at Oxford to cut the cheese (called in the north of England, in allusion to the mother’s complaints at delivery, “the Groaning Cheese”) in the middle when the child is born, and so by degrees … Continue reading

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The Romance of Language: Word for the Week 3/31/17

Whirligigs: Testicles. –from B. E. Gent’s Dictionary of the Canting Crew, c. 1699        Somehow I think that is enough said. LOL At least I used a classic to illustrate the “whirligigs.” A modern definition from Merriam-Webster is “one that … Continue reading

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The Romance of Language: Word for the Week 3/24/17

Pree: “To taste; as, pree my sneeshin, taste my snuff.” –from John Jamieson’s Supplement to the Etymological Dictionary of the Scottish                                       … Continue reading

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The Romance of Language: Word for the Week 3/17/17

Poteen: “Irish whiskey made in small, often illicit stills. from Latin Poitin, a small pot.” –from C.A.M. Fennell’s   Stanford Dictionary of Anglicised Words and Phrases, 1964   Happy St. Patrick’s Day! I looked and looked to find a word worthy of … Continue reading

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The Romance of Language: Word for the Week 3/10/17

Accoucher: “He who practises the art of midwifery, a man-midwife.” –from Robley Dunglison’s  Dictionary of Medical Science, 1844 An obstetrician; from French accoucher, to deliver. –from Richard Hoblyn’s  Dictionary of Terms Used in Medicine, 1859 I’d heard this term before while reading … Continue reading

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