Tag Archives: forgotten words

The Romance of Language: Word for the Week 3/24/17

Pree: “To taste; as, pree my sneeshin, taste my snuff.” –from John Jamieson’s Supplement to the Etymological Dictionary of the Scottish                                       … Continue reading

Posted in Romance of Language | Tagged , , , , , | Leave a comment

The Romance of Language: Word for the Week 3/17/17

Poteen: “Irish whiskey made in small, often illicit stills. from Latin Poitin, a small pot.” –from C.A.M. Fennell’s   Stanford Dictionary of Anglicised Words and Phrases, 1964   Happy St. Patrick’s Day! I looked and looked to find a word worthy of … Continue reading

Posted in Romance of Language | Tagged , , , , , | Leave a comment

The Romance of Language: Word for the Week 3/10/17

Accoucher: “He who practises the art of midwifery, a man-midwife.” –from Robley Dunglison’s  Dictionary of Medical Science, 1844 An obstetrician; from French accoucher, to deliver. –from Richard Hoblyn’s  Dictionary of Terms Used in Medicine, 1859 I’d heard this term before while reading … Continue reading

Posted in Romance of Language | Tagged , , , , , , | Leave a comment

The Romance of Language: Word for the Week 3/03/17

Curglaff: “The shock felt in bathing when one first plunges into the cold water.” –from John Jamieson’s Etymological Dictionary of the Scottish Language, 1808 Curglotft: panic-struck –from Alexander Warrack’s Scots Dialect Dictionary, 1911     The first thing I thought of when seeing … Continue reading

Posted in Romance of Language | Tagged , , , , , , | Leave a comment

The Romance of Language: Word for the Week 2/24/17

Murmuration: “A flock of starlings.” –from C.E. Hare’s The Language of Field Sports, 1939 Therefore, a murmuration of starlings.   There are so many strange words to denote groups of animals, and apparently there is one for each kind of animal. … Continue reading

Posted in Romance of Language | Tagged , , , , , | 10 Comments

The Romance of Language: Word for the Week 2/17/17

Dammy-boy: “An unruly person, in allusion to the habit of the excessive use of the word damn.” –from Albert Hyamson’s Dictionary English Phrases, 1922   I’ve had a couple of heroes who could have been called “dammy-boys.” LOL And here’s … Continue reading

Posted in Romance of Language | Tagged , , , , , , , , | 2 Comments

The Romance of Language: Word for the Week 2/10/17

Callithumpian: “Designating a band of discordant instruments; of or pertaining to such a band. A member of a callithumpian band.” –from William Craigie’s Dictionary of American English, 1940   “Callithump seem …to be of American origin. It represents the French … Continue reading

Posted in Romance of Language | Tagged , , , , , , , | 2 Comments