Where in the World is Jenna Jaxon? (Part 11)

Good Morning all! Here’s the latest from

WROTHAM!

WROTHAM

I left Cornwall on the last leg of my world-wind tour of England on Saturday morning, facing more challenging train changes to get to Wrotham Village in Kent. The bulk of the journey was fine, the Great Western Railway taking me from Penzance to London in about five hours, despite the weather that caused some trains to be delayed or canceled. At Paddington Station, however, I had to change to Charing Cross station for my final leg into Kent. Navigating the Underground with 3 pieces of luggage was a bit of a challenge, but I made it in time for the 3:00 train to Sevenoaks. From there it was a bit of a taxi ride to get to Wrotham Village (have since found out there’s a closer station) and The Bull Hotel.

THE BULL INN

The reason I’m in this part of Kent is strictly because of my first Widows’ Club book, To Woo A Wicked Widow. I set it in the little village of Wrotham and so simply h)ad to come see the place I’d researched so much. There’s a scene in the book set in the Bull, an inn that’s been in existence since 1280. So when I discovered I could actually stay there, I was crazy excited.

The village is very small (especially contrasted with the recent places I’d been), so I was able to do the walking tour in about an hour or so, before having dinner in the restaurant downstairs (yes, once again my room is on the top floor).

THE BULL INN RESTAURANT

THE BULL INN RESTAURANT 2

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

In To Woo A Wicked Widow, I had Charlotte, the heroine, take her guests on a walking tour of the village, where she meets with Nash, the hero, and he actually takes them around showing them all of the village. So there’s a scene in the inn, then they walk down the street (now literally about 300 feet) to St. George’s Church. A must see on my walking tour.

ST. GEORGE’S CHURCH

INTERIOR STAINED GLASS WINDOW

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

THE CHURCH NAVE

BRASS PLAQUES FOR INTERMENTS

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

All of these pictures illustrate parts of Nash’s tour of the church. The only thing they were able to do that I was not was go up into the clock tower. I saw no access and didn’t want to press my luck, given the age of the tower.

I wandered up and down the streets, taking dozens of pictures. This place is Wrotham Place, which used to be a royal lodge. It was here that Henry VIII awaited news of Ann Boleyn’s execution. (Also mentioned in my novel.)

WROTHAM PLACE

WROTHAM PLACE 2

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

And here’s what the rest of the village looks like:

WROTHAM VILLAGE 1

WROTHAM VILLAGE 2

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

WROTHAM VILLAGE 3

Because the village was so small and I got all my touring done within an hour, and because the weather decided not to cooperate, I spent all of Sunday evening and most of the day Monday resting and writing. Not a bad thing given how much I’ve been traveling.

This morning I was off and running heading back to London for a couple of days and awaiting my next journey. Those details coming at the end of the week!

Cheers!

Jenna

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4 Responses to Where in the World is Jenna Jaxon? (Part 11)

  1. One more bit of Britain checked off the must-see list. Wrotham must have seemed pretty ho-hum after the recent places you’ve been. On to the next adventure!

    Liked by 1 person

    • Jenna Jaxon says:

      It was charming in its own way, Trish, but a very small village. Still, it was exciting to see the places I used in my novels come to life. Whenever I sat down to eat I’d think, that’s where Jemmy sat and drank ale and that’s where Nash drank and talked with the smithy. 🙂

      Like

  2. Thanks for setting up this interesting wonderful part of the world. Years ago, my pilot husband and I traveled through England, Italy, and many more countries. Those days are gone but not forgotten. Hugs to you, my friend.

    Liked by 1 person

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