Alphabet Post: Y is for Yarrow

I really couldn’t find a decent word for a letter X post, so I’ve skipped on to Y. The letter Y  is for yarrow, a medicinal plant in use for centuries in the Northern Hemisphere.  It’s a weed that grows during the summer and has been used to treat a variety of illnesses.

yarrow02-l

Yarrow–also called milefoil, Soldier’s Woundwart, Knights milefoil, and Nose Bleed– if made into a tea, is used to treat severe colds and fever as it induces sweating. It has also been used as a treatment for hemorrhoids and kidney disorders.  As a topical application, it has been used to prevent baldness if the head is washed with a decoction of it.

Another strange property of this herb is that both causes the nose to bleed if rubbed on the inside of the nostril (apparently to relieve headache), but it will also stop a nose bleed and in ancient times was used as a styptic.

If the fresh leaves are chewed, they are said to cure toothache.

It can also, apparently, be used to divine your true love, according to A Modern Herbal:

“An ounce of Yarrow sewed up in flannel and placed under the pillow before going to bed, having repeated the following words, brought a vision of the future husband or wife:

‘Thou pretty herb of Venus’ tree,

Thy true name it is Yarrow;

Now who my bosom friend must be,

Pray tell thou me to-morrow.’—(Halliwell’s Popular Rhymes, etc.)”

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2 Responses to Alphabet Post: Y is for Yarrow

  1. lizaoconnor says:

    I am not letting an annoying weed pick my true love!

    Like

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